Salkantay

Apu Salkantay

Lena and I decided to attempt the Salkantay Trail, a 56 km trail beginning in the small town of Mollepata, passing through a 4,800 meter pass next to Apu Salkantay, and finally ending in Aguas Calientes, at the base of Machu Picchu. We made the trek in five days, with no guide, and have put together this report to document our journey. There is a lot of information (and photos!) here, and I have tried to include as much information as possible for someone who wishes to attempt this trek on their own, as well as portray our personal journey on this trail. This post is divided into sections, beginning with an introduction to the trail, followed by a day-by-day summary of our adventures.

The famous Salkantay Trek, named among the 25 best Treks in the World, by National Geographic Adventure Travel Magazine, is a trek open to everybody, with no limitation on spaces or permits (at least for now). Connecting the city of Mollepata with Machu Picchu, the Salkantay Trek is an ancient and remote footpath located in the same region as the Inca Trail where massive snowcapped mountains collide with lush tropical rain forests.

Located less than fifty miles northwest of the city of Cusco in south central Peru by the Cordillera Vilcabamba and rising to 6271 meters above sea level (20574 ft) Mt. Salkantay is an outstanding glacier-capped summit worshipped for thousands of years by local indians. The name Salkantay is a quechua word meaning “Savage Mountain” (From www.salkantay.org)

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Salkantay Introduction
Day 1 – Cusco to Mollepata
Day 2 – Mollepata to Soraypampa
Day 3 – Soraypampa, Abra Salkantay, Huaracmachay, Chaullay
Day 4 – Chaullay, La Playa, Lucmabamba
Day 5 – Lucmabamba, Llactapata, Hydro Electrica, Aguas Calientes

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8 Comments on "Salkantay"

  1. avatar
    Sarah
    08/12/2010 at 18:38 Permalink

    If you ever should be in Argentina (I now that’s quite unsure), don’t make the mistake to think the collectivos are unpunctual as in Peru. They aren’t. I had to run quickly when I became aware of it.
    Lena, I’m really sad to see you without your dreads, which I really liked, as you know. And I’m also sad that you doesn’t posted a nice picture of your new haircut. I only see a kind of baby bird feathers on your head and I’m pretty sure that your hair changed after Jason took that picture 😉
    Anyhow, I hope you two are doing well and that you could have had a rest after that exhausting trip. Are you back in Cuzco now?

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  1. [...] is the fist part in a five-part series documenting our journey trekking the Salktantay Trek, from Mollepata to Aguas…

  2. [...] is the second part in a five-part series documenting our journey trekking the Salktantay Trek, from Mollepata to Aguas…

  3. [...] is the third part in a five-part series documenting our journey trekking the Salktantay Trek, from Mollepata to Aguas…

  4. [...] is the fourth part in a five-part series documenting our journey trekking the Salktantay Trek, from Mollepata to Aguas…

  5. [...] is the fifth and final part in a five-part series documenting our journey trekking the Salktantay Trek, from Mollepata…

  6. Machu Picchu | ¡TravelSickness! 10/12/2010 at 14:53

    [...] final destination of our Salkantay Trek, was of course the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu. I think Machu Picchu…

  7. [...] Peru photos, galleries for Salkantay and Machu Picchu are both online.Back in November, Lena and I walked the Salkantay…

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